What People with Asthma Need to Know About COVID-19

You probably already know that COVID-19 can affect people in different ways. But it’s important to know what those ways are, especially if you have a chronic lung condition, such as asthma

At Regional Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Center, our specialists want to keep everyone informed throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 poses increased risks for people with asthma, because the virus can cause respiratory symptoms. Therefore it’s essential to take care of yourself and know when to seek medical attention.

Recognizing the signs of COVID-19

COVID-19 is a viral infection. Most people with COVID-19 only experience mild symptoms, and the illness usually resolves with rest and self-care. In some cases, however, COVID-19 can cause severe symptoms and even death.

COVID-19 spreads by breathing in droplets in the air from an infected person or by touching a contaminated object and then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes. Once infected, the virus can cause several symptoms, many of which can impact the respiratory system. 

Common signs of COVID-19 include:

If you have COVID-19 symptoms, you should contact your primary care provider right away, especially if you have asthma. 

The risks of COVID-19 if you have asthma

From what we know about the coronavirus, people who live with moderate to severe asthma may have a higher risk of developing more severe COVID-19 symptoms if they get the virus. 

If you live with asthma, a COVID-19 infection may:

Acute respiratory disease is particularly dangerous in children, older adults, and people with a compromised immune system. Acute respiratory disease requires immediate medical attention, regardless of age. 

It’s crucial to do everything possible to reduce your risk of contracting COVID-19, especially if you have a pre-existing condition that affects your respiratory system, such as asthma.

Protecting yourself from COVID-19

To reduce your risk of getting COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends doing the following: 

In addition to these steps, it’s imperative to continue following your individualized treatment plan if you have asthma. If you can’t manage your symptoms or they’ve changed, contact our team as soon as possible to schedule an exam so we can evaluate your action plan. You should also continue taking current medications, including any inhalers.

If you have questions about asthma treatment or COVID-19, book an appointment online or over the phone with Regional Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Center today.

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