Tips for Managing Asthma During the Summer Months

It’s not easy struggling to breathe. During an asthma attack, the airway walls swell, thus reducing the space through which air can pass. Attacks often have an activator, called an asthma trigger, and there are summertime conditions that can make living with asthma more challenging.

You need a medical partner for your asthma management plan. The team at Regional Allergy Asthma & Immunology Center are asthma specialists. Our team is ready to help you breathe easier and help support you. Here’s what you need to know to keep the summer months asthma-free.

Summertime triggers

There are certain factors that can cause asthma attacks, and these can vary between asthma patients. Over time, you’ll likely detect patterns in your responses, and once these patterns are identified, it should be easier to know how to avoid these triggers.

Changes in the warmer months can cause conditions that may irritate asthma sufferers. Pollen may be an issue throughout the growing season. Mold can be a problem all year long, but it can be more active during the summer months.

Summer is a busy and active time, but sometimes too much vigorous play can bring on an attack. Extreme heat, particularly a stretch lasting several days or more, could make any of these triggers more active, or it could be a trigger on its own.

Staying ahead of asthma

Plan around your sensitivities and maintain a margin of error. Try to anticipate and plan for the worst cases, beyond what you may expect.

Watch the conditions

Be sure to watch the temperature forecast. Unusually hot weather can make staying home the better choice, even if there’s water at your destination. Watch the air quality index and pollen report for your area, too.

Be “med aware”

Always have your reliever medication with you if you’re not already carrying it. Combinations of conditions could create unexpected asthma attacks. Treat asthma medications appropriately, too, keeping them nearby and as cool as possible. Don’t leave it inside your closed and parked car.

Plan the day

The most direct sun and hottest temperatures typically fall from 10am-2pm. Planning activities before and after these hours and retreating to air-conditioned indoor conditions in between can make things easier.

Plan for emergencies

Knowing what to do ahead of an emergency will always help you function safely and effectively. If you don’t already have an asthma emergency plan, consult with the team at Regional Allergy Asthma & Immunology Center to get one.

If you have asthma, our team wants to partner with you so you stay healthy. To learn more about helping manage your asthma, book an appointment online or over the phone.

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